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10 Early Signs of Pregnancy

It's been a couple weeks since you did the deed, and now you're dying to know: am I pregnant? You'll need a home pregnancy test or a blood test at your OB's office to know for sure, but until you can take one (the best time is once your period is late) click through these early signs of pregnancy and see if any of them feel familiar.

Shortness of Breath

Do you get winded going up the stairs all of a sudden? It might be because you’re pregnant. The growing fetus needs oxygen, leaving you a little short. Sorry to say, this one may continue throughout your pregnancy, especially as your growing baby starts to put pressure on your lungs and diaphragm.

Sore Breasts

Putting on your bra this morning felt like mild torture. And are you imagining it, or are the girls a little bigger? Tender and heavy-feeling breasts, darkening of the areolas and even more pronounced veins on your chest can be a first sign that you're pregnant. Wear your most supportive bra—to bed if you need it—to help ease discomfort.

Fatigue

You didn't even make it through one page of your book last night before falling asleep. If you're suddenly exhausted, it might be a response to the increasing hormones in your body. For many women, tiredness continues through the first trimester, but then ebbs in the second.

Nausea

Most pregnant women start to get the queasies when they're about 6 weeks along, but some can experience morning sickness (which unfortunately can occur morning, noon and night) earlier. It will most likely subside as you enter the second trimester. In the mean time, try to eat foods that will settle your stomach, like crackers or ginger ale.

Frequent Urination

If you suddenly find yourself unable to sleep through the night without a trip to the loo, it might be a sign. During pregnancy your body produces extra fluids, which has your bladder working overtime—and you taking a lot of pee breaks.

Headaches

More early signs of pregnancy include an aching head, a result of changes in hormones. Just in case you are indeed pregnant, take pg-safe acetaminophen instead of ibuprofen to deal with the pain.

Backaches

Is your lower back a little sore? If you don't normally have back pain, it could mean your ligaments are loosening. Sorry, this one might continue through your pregnancy as your weight gain and shifting center of gravity throw your posture out of whack.


Cramping

Is it PMS or pregnancy? It's hard to tell, but if you're feeling crampy, it might be your uterus stretching to get ready for a baby.